Signs and Symptoms Doctors Look For To Diagnose Lupus

To help doctors diagnose lupus, a list of 11 common criteria was developed by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR). ACR is a professional association of rheumatologists. Rheumatologists are the doctors who specialize in treating diseases of the joints and muscles, like Lupus. If you have/had at least four of the criteria on the list, there is a strong chance that you may have Lupus.

  1. Malar rash – a rash over the cheeks and nose, often in the shape of a butterfly
  2. Discoid rash – a rash that appears as red, raised, disk-shaped patches
  3. Photosensitivity – a reaction to sun or light that causes a skin rash to appear or get worse
  4. Oral ulcers – sores appearing in the mouth
  5. Arthritis – joint pain and swelling of two or more joints in which the bones around the joints do not become destroyed
  6. Serositis – inflammation of the lining around the lungs (pleuritis) or inflammation of the lining around the heart that causes chest pain which is worse with deep breathing (pericarditis)
  7. Kidney disorder – persistent protein or cellular casts in the urine
  8. Neurological disorder – seizures or psychosis
  9. Blood disorder – anemia (low red blood cell count), leukopenia (low white blood cell count), lymphopenia (low level of specific white blood cells), or thrombocytopenia (low platelet count)
  10. Immunologic disorder – anti-DNA or anti-Sm or positive antiphospholipid antibodies
  11. Abnormal or positive antinuclear antibody (ANA) lab test

If you have yet to receive a Lupus diagnosis but feel you have Lupus based on the above criteria, it is important to speak with your healthcare provider to voice your concerns so that appropriate treatment can begin.

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